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WirisQuizzes User Interface

All mathematical content in a WIRIS question type is handled from WirisQuizzes Studio or Studio for short. Studio can always be accessed from a Wiris question type by pressing this icon:

quizzes_studio_4.png

Once we are in WirisQuizzes Studio, the available options will depend on the type of question we are editing. In this case, we are using a Short Answer type, which has the most features in Studio out of all the question types. We’ll find settings for controlling various aspects of the question in a way that allows mathematical content to be handled flexibly.

WirisQuizzes Studio interface when Text answer type is selected

WirisQuizzes Studio main section

In the initial screen, you can mainly control the answer field for the student and set the question's correct answer. This answer field will be different depending on the selected Answer type. You can see the possible options here.

WirisQuizzes Studio main section where you can enter the correct answer for the question and its initial content

Moreover, you can also add initial content to the editor so the students will see it when they open the question. There are auxiliary texts in both sections to clarify the difference between the existing options.

  • Initial Content: The initial state of the answer editor that your students will see when attempting the question. You can lock it so students can't modify it as if they were answering a Fill in the Blank question. You can see how here.

  • Correct Answer: The place where you can enter the correct answer for this question. You can modify the criteria used to compare it to your students' answers using the Validation options section.

To the left of the editor, you can find the three main sections that will allow you to deepen into the multiple capabilities of the tool.

Three main sections (answer type, settings and random variables) to deepen into the multiple capabilities of the tool

Below, you can find several hyperlinks with helpful information about the WirisQuizzes product, report issues, provide us with your feedback and suggestions, and enrol on our free or premium training courses.

Several hyperlinks to enroll in the training, visit the documentation, give feedback about the prouct or report an issue

On the other hand, below the editor, you can find a notification box where you can find product information and alerts with valuable links to our documentation and others.

Product notificaction box with WirisQuizzes information and alerts

At the upper right corner of the screen, you can find a File menu to help you manage the question file and find support. The question mark button guides you to our documentation website pages according to the section of the Studio you're in - answer types, input options, validation options, random variables.

Topx auliary buttons that supports you when managing the question file and finding support.

Finally, at the lower-left corner of the screen, you can find a preview section to simulate the question quickly without having to save or exit the question editor. Besides, you can also find the button to save the changes or to close WirisQuizzes Studio without doing so.

Buttons to test the question, to save it or to close WirisQuizzes Studio without saving the changes

Answer type section

In the left sidebar, you can find the Answer type panel. When choosing the type of response, there are several options in which we expect the student's answer format. Each of them will involve different settings, but on this page, we will focus on the equation answer type interface (other interfaces are explained on the corresponding linked pages).

Sidebar navigation menu through the existing answer types

You can choose between the four possible options below:

  • Equation: Any mathematical expression, including those involving units and currencies. This is the default option, and it is probably the type you need in most cases. More details here.

  • Text: For pure text answers with no mathematical content. This option is rarely used. More details here.

  • Plotter: For geometric graphical answers drawn by the students. More details here.

  • Statistics charts: For statistics graphical answers drawn by the students. Bar charts, line charts and pie charts are currently available. More details here.

Note

In previous versions of WirisQuizzes, you had to distinguish between mathematical expressions and quantities involving units. It won't be necessary from now on, and both options are included under the Equation option.

Settings section

Besides the Answer type section, in the same sidebar, you can find the Settings section. It's divided into the Input options section and the Validation options section.

Settings panel with two sections: input options and validation options

Input options

In the Input options screen, it's possible to filter the shown options from the beginning, based on an analysis of the correct answer. Thus, only the most relevant options will appear, clearing the window of all the possibilities that the tool offers that may not be of interest.

Panel to filter the input options based on an analysis of the correct answer

However, you can always select the Show all options box if you want to take a look at all the entry possibilities. From here, if they are all displayed, the window is divided into three sections.

Compound answer

In Short answer questions, you can ask for more than one answer to a single question. You can choose to grade the whole question as incorrect if any of the answers are not accurate or give each answer a weight in the grade. For more details, see this page: Compound answer.

Compound answer panel to decide whether you want to evaluate each answer box independently or not

Answer input method

The Answer input method section is divided into three. The first one is named Answer input field.

input_field.png

Here, you can choose the answer field for the student from the following options:

  • Math editor embedded: Select this for the student to use an embedded editor (default).

  • Math editor in a popup: Select this for the student to use a small input box with a button to insert formulas with our editor.

  • Plain text: Select this for the student to use a small input box with no formula editor.

One of the above three is always selected. Below, you can find the second subsection named Auxiliary input.

auxiliary_input.png

Here, you can choose what kind of additional entry you want to offer to the students. There are also three options:

  • Display auxiliary CalcMe: You can supply your students with our online calculator while answering the question and set initial content for the calculator if desired. Keep in mind that the calculator can do a lot more than numerical computations!

  • Display auxiliary text field: You can provide your students with a text editor to make them include the reasoning they have followed to answer the question. For more details, see this page: Auxiliary input.

  • Don't show auxiliary input: Don't show the auxiliary CalcMe calculator nor the additional text editor in the input field for the student's answer.

One of the above three is always selected. Below, you can find the final subsection named Initial content.

Initial content panel to do not allow the student to modify the answer outside of the empty placeholders

Here you can decide whether you want to lock the initial content or not. If this setting is enabled, the student will only be able to fill in the boxes of the initial content.

Caution

For the moment, it's not possible to use this feature with matrices due to MathType limitations. We'll work to enable it as soon as possible.

Input syntax

Finally, you can find the Input syntax section, where you select what kind of input is expected from the student and how the correct answer is validated against the student answer. The primary function of many of the options is to decide how syntax checking works on the student side. For example, [0,1) is usually highlighted as the incorrect syntax unless we choose the Intervals option. The section is divided into several parts, explained below.

Firstly, you can choose which symbols are recognized as mathematical constants instead of variables (e.g., if i is enabled, then i2 will be understood as –1). You can also define more constants at the Define random variables and functions pannel.

constants.png

Secondly, you can choose which function names are recognized by their usual meaning (e.g., if exp/log is enabled, then "ln(2)" will be understood and calculated as 0.6931...).

functions.png

Then, you can choose which units are recognized. Notice that any of them is selected by default; you will have to enable manually those units in which you are interested.

units.png

In addition, you can also choose which unit prefixes are recognized. Again, you have to enable it manually, as they are all unselected by default.

prefixes.png

Afterwards, you can define which of the following constructions are allowed as correct answers.

allowed_constructions.png

You can see a detailed description of each construction in the table below.

Option

Description

Default

Mixed fractions

Allow mixed fractions to be recognized. Without this option, a number next to a fraction is understood to be multiplying it.

Unselected

Lists

Allow lists as answers. Otherwise, they are interpreted as parentheses. Options for list separators are shown below.

Selected

Lists without enclosers

Allows lists not enclosed in curly brackets to be recognized as a list (e.g., if not selected, "4,7,88,9" would not be understood as a list: it would be highlighted as syntactically incorrect).

Unselected

Intervals

Recognizes interval notation as valid syntax. Expressions like [0,1] are already useful without this, but now we may have, for instance, ]0,1] or (0,1]. More details here.

Unselected

Ratios

Allows formulas like 2:3:5 to be interpreted as ratios. Otherwise, they are successive regular divisions.

Unselected

Computer scientific notation

Allows formulas like 1.5e-5 or 1.5E-5 to be interpreted as decimal numbers in scientific notation.

Unselected

Tip

See a detailed explanation of lists and sets here. See a detailed explanation of percentages and per mille use here.

Finally, you can decide which symbols act as separators by choosing the meaning of point, comma, and space symbols. Additionally, you can use apostrophes ' for decimal marks. You only have to check that º'" are unselected as units of measure.

separator.png

Validation options

As you have seen in the input options section, it is possible to filter the shown options from the beginning, based on an analysis of the correct answer. Thus, only the most relevant options will appear, clearing the window of all the possibilities that the tool offers that may not be of interest.

Panel to filter the input options based on an analysis of the correct answer

However, you can always select the Show all options box if you want to take a look at all the entry possibilities. From here, if they are all displayed, the window is divided into four sections.

Comparison with student answer

Once you have decided what format you expect the student answer to be in, you have a few options for how their response should be compared to the correct one.

comparison_with_student_answer.png

You can see a detailed description of each option in the table below.

Comparison with student answer criteria

Literally equal

This removes all mathematical interpretations from the comparison. The student's answer is only correct if it matches the correct answer exactly. For example, if the correct answer is 4, but the student writes 4.0, it will not be counted. This criterion is rarely recommended.

Mathematically equal

This is the default comparison. It will detect if what the student has written is mathematically equal to the correct answer. For example, we don't need to worry if the student writes a + b or b + a. You can find three checkboxes below to choose if order and repetition are ignored or not from lists.

More details

Compare as lists/sets

Order and repetition matter in lists: When checked, the elements in the student's answer must be in the same order and appear the same number of times as in the correct answer.

More details

Repetition matters in lists, but order does not: When checked, the elements in the student's must appear the same number of times as in the correct answer, but not necessarily in the same order.

More details

Order and repetition don't matter in lists: When checked, order and repetition are ignored from lists. So, if the correct answer is the set {1,5,2}, then {5,5,5,2,1} (for example) would be accepted.

More details

Equivalent equations

This comparison is very similar to the mathematically equal option. Still, it is for the particular case where the answer is an equation (e.g. the student could write y=2x-5, or 2.5=x-y2, or any equivalent form).

More details

Any answer

Anything that the student answers will be counted as correct. This is useful in some cases.

More details

Grading function

Define your own function to decide which answers are accepted and how to grade them. This is an advanced feature.

More details

Numbers

In the Numbers section, we specify the tolerance criteria used to compare the student's answer and the correct answer. These settings apply globally (to the entire question), and they are divided into four. Firstly, you need to choose if you want the answer to be symbolic or not.

symbolic.png

If you select this option, any answer expressed with decimal numbers will be graded as incorrect. It must be a combination of operations, fractions, roots, and functions to do so. If it's enabled, it will be the only option available.

Otherwise, you can specify the tolerance criteria used to compare the student's answer and the correct answer.

tolerance.png

You can choose between the three possible options:

  • Exact answer: This option requires the student's response to be exactly equal to the correct answer.

  • Error margin: This option requires the student's answer strictly within the tolerance interval. You can define this margin as a percent error or an absolute error. It's selected by default at 0,1 percent error.

  • Matching digits: This option requires the student's answer to match the first significant figures or decimal places with the correct answer.

Tip

You can see more details about the tolerance available options here.

Below, you can choose the format in which you want to require the student's answer.

format.png

You can choose between the three possible options:

  • Scientific notation: This option requires the student's answer to be expressed in normalized scientific notation.

  • Decimal notation: This option requires the student's answer to be expressed in plain decimal notation.

  • Any notation: This option allows the student's answer to be expressed either in scientific or decimal. It's selected by default.

Tip

You can see more details about the format available options here.

Below, you can define a precision that requires the student's answer. It allows you to check the minimum and the maximum number of significant figures or decimal places the student answer must-have.

precision.png

Simplification

Sometimes it's not just the value of the answer that's important, but also its form. This usually happens when you teach basic algebraic manipulation and want the answer in a particular format.

simplification.png

You can see a detailed description of each option in the table below.

Specific property

Correct examples

Wrong examples

Simplified

It checks whether the expression cannot be simplified. Includes fractions, powers and roots, polynomials...

x3\left(\sqrt x\right)^3

x4\left(\sqrt x\right)^4

Expanded

It checks whether all operations that can be done are performed

2727

1+11+1

Factorized

It checks whether an integer or a polynomial is expressed as product of primes

24·32^4\cdot3

4848

Common factors

It checks whether the summands of the answer have no common factors

2(2+3+4)2(2+3+4)

4+6+84+6+8

Common denominator

It checks whether the answer has a single common denominator

x+1x-1\frac{x+1}{x-1}

x+1x-1+x-1x+1\frac{x+1}{x-1}+\frac{x-1}{x+1}

Rationalized

It checks whether the expression does not have square (or higher) roots in the denominator. It also checks whether the expression has a pure real denominator (in the case of complex numbers)

22\frac{\sqrt2}2

12\frac1{\sqrt2}

Minimal radicands

It checks whether any present radicands are minimal

222\sqrt2

8\sqrt8

Match unit of measure

It checks whether the unit of the answer is literally equal to the given one

3km3\text{km}, given km\text{km}

3m·s-13\text{m}\cdot\text{s}^{-1}, given m/s\text{m}/\text{s}

Tip

For a complete and advanced description of all the properties, see assertions.

Random variables section

The Define random variables and functions section is at the core of many of WirisQuizzes capabilities. We define variables here in a computer algebra system (CAS), and these are used in various parts of the question definition, mainly in the question's statement and correct answer. If you're familiar with CalcMe, then you have a head start. If not, it's easy to get started. You can think of it as an extensive scientific calculator, but it can also manipulate symbolic equations. You can always check CalcMe basic guide.

Define random variables and function section with CalcMe as the default calculator

Declaring variables

Variables are defined by writing a name for a variable, an equal sign, and an expression on the right-hand side. For example:

calc.declaring_variables.1.calc.png

Note

If you used CalcMe before, you might have noticed some differences with previous versions. You can see further details about the new procedure to declare variables here.

Within this field, variables can be manipulated and acted on, and new variables can be defined from old ones, just as on paper. For instance:

calc.declaring_variables.2.calc.png

There are two details to note:

Caution

  • The left-hand side can be any letter or word without spaces, excluding reserved words (e.g. sin, cos).

  • The right-hand side can be any reasonable mathematical expression, numerical (as in the first variable above) or algebraic (as in the second).

Algorithm language

The algorithm field is available in multiple languages. By default, the language of the CAS will be the same as Moodle or English as the fallback. But you can choose another one of the available languages.

If you change the CalcMe language, then any existing algorithm will be automatically translated. This is very useful if you have algorithms in other languages, like the ones in the STEM collection.

Animation showing how to change the CalcMe language

Inserting variables

Those are the basics of how variables function inside of WirisQuizzes Studio works. What's very important, though, is to know how to use these variables outside of Studio.

To include a variable anywhere within a question type, write a pound symbol # followed by the name of the variable (e.g. #a). So we could include the above polynomial in a question just like this:

Statement of a WirisQuizzes question involving variables

This would appear to the student as:

Preview of the corresponding WirisQuizzes question involving variables

Tip

It's also possible to insert these variables in the question's feedback. Furthermore, you can use the student's answer there. Learn how to do it here.Student's answer throughout a question

Random variables

Perhaps the most important use of variables is introducing randomness in a question. There is a simple instruction in CalcMe that generates random numbers, random(). For example,

calc_random_calc.png

Generates a random number between -10 and 10. This could then be used in the question text, as we have seen. The result is that each time the question is opened, a random value for a is used. So, students viewing the same question will see potentially different values.

Tip

There are many ways to exploit this feature, and we list a few of them ourselves in the basic guide. Similarly, if you want to see examples of questions that use randomness at different levels, you can see their dedicated page.

Output options

Different countries, education levels, or textbooks, use different notations. You can configure some output options in the Application settings section inside CalcMe to better match the notation you use.

These options apply only to the values generated in the Algorithm field, i.e. the variables. All generated values will be in the same notation; you can not create values in different notations.

CalcMe application settings panel

Imaginary unit

Choose between i and j (often used in electrical engineering).

application_settings_imaginary.png

Times operator

Choose between middle dot · and cross x. Set Implicit to hide all non-necessary products, that is, implicit products.

application_settings_operator.png

Precision

Precision must be an integer between 1 and 15 included, and it can be set as Significant figures or Decimal places. By default, it is Precision = 4 significant figures.

All notations usually imply a rounding. When rounding, the rule used for tie-breaking is half-up.

precision.png

Tip

Visit our dedicated page for complete detailed information about tolerance, precision, and notation.

Notation

These notations apply only to decimal numbers. Numbers and expressions without a decimal point are exact, so these notations don't apply to them. You can always convert an explicit expression to decimal by multiplying by 1.0 , for instance.

application_settings_notation.png

Tip

Visit our dedicated page for complete detailed information about tolerance, precision, and notation.

Decimal

Choose the symbol for the decimal mark. Available options depend on the Validation options section symbols in Options... > Separators marked as Decimal digits. Trailing decimal points of integer numbers are never shown.

application_settings_decimal.png

Thousands

Choose the symbol for the digit groups separator, that is, thousands separator. Available options depend on the Validation options section symbols in Options... > Separators marked as Digit groups.

application_settings_thousands.png

List items

Choose the symbol for the list items separator. Available options depend on the Validation options section symbols in Options... > Separators marked as List items.

application_settings_list.png

Test this question

The Test this question section allows you to simulate the question behaviour quickly, without saving, exiting the question editor, etc. Specifically, you can test evaluation criteria, automatic feedback, and variables. The preview interface looks like this:

Test this question button

We will now examine the separate elements of the preview panel.

Student answer

This is a formula editor exactly as the student will have, where you can write a test answer.

preview_editor.png

Note

It's easy to see the toolbar in the editor window presented to the student is different from the MathType toolbar you usually see. This more straightforward toolbar is easier to navigate and contains all the symbols and templates the student will likely need when answering quizzes. See the Toolbar and icons page in the MathType docs for complete toolbar documentation.

Correct answer

The correct answer will be shown in the blank on the left. Click the arrow button prev_ex1.5.png to input the correct answer into the answer blank above automatically. If any variables are defined in the variable tab, there will also be a refresh icon prev_ex1.6.png. When clicked, all algorithms are executed again. In particular, any random elements will be newly generated.

preview_ca.png

Feedback

The defined feedback will be shown in the blank below. If more than one property is required, it will lead us to which student's answer satisfies and which does not.

preview_feedback.png

Import and Export

You can Export and Import the contents of WirisQuizzes Studio.

Top buttons with the import and export options remarked

The Export button will immediately download an XML file containing all settings of all tabs of the studio. Your browser will automatically save this file or ask you where to put it, like any other download. If you are using Studio inside an LMS (Moodle, Canvas,…), then be aware you are not exporting the question; you are exporting only the Studio settings.

The Import button is the reverse action of Export. You can use Export and Import to help you to:

  • Move algorithms between questions.

  • Change the type of a question, for instance, from shortanswer into multichoice.

  • Move questions between LMS, for instance, from Moodle to Canvas.

  • Provide detailed bug reports to support@wiris.com.

Languages

WirisQuizzes is multilingual, and it is today available in the following languages:

Language

Original name

Configuration code

Catalan

català

ca

Danish

dansk

da

English

English

en

French

français

fr

German

Deutsch

de

Greek

ελληνικά

el

Italian

italiano

it

Norwegian bokmal

norsk bokmål

nb

Norwegian nynorsk

norsk nynorsk

nn

Portuguese

português

pt

Portuguese Brazilian

português brasileiro

pt_br

Spanish

español

es